September 10, 2020

I'm a mixed (Black, Jewish, Native American) boomer, very light-skinned and so racially ambiguous looking that most people question, assume and try to challenge my racial identity. 

My copper-toned Black father hated that I wouldn’t exploit my appearance to “be anything.” My Russian Jewish mother wondered about my lifelong allegiance to Blackness and my stubborn insistence on conveying the messy totality of my DNA even when it...

July 7, 2020

On the day in mid-March when Atlanta Public Schools closed in response to the novel coronavirus pandemic, Kimberly Dukes, a mother of 10 whose children attend three of the lowest-performing schools in the district, was confronted with a logistical nightmare. 

Her three high schoolers each had school-issued laptops, but the six younger children in middle and elementary school had one device to share. Even her 3-year-old in day c...

April 26, 2020

As a former Los Angeles middle school teacher, I know firsthand what statistics show: schools are failing to prepare the majority of African-American students for success. Our Black teenagers are in a learning crisis. Covid-19 is about to make it much worse.

A 2017 report by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) found that just 18 percent of Black eighth-graders reach reading “proficiency.” And in 2015 NAEP fou...

January 28, 2020

When I was in the 11th grade, I had the opportunity to write my first screenplay through NAACP’s Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO) program. The program provides a platform for Black high school students—more than 300,000 to date—to bring their ideas to life and kickstart their journeys to becoming leaders in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), humanities, business, and the ar...

Parents of this Black student (pictured), filed a federal civil rights lawsuit alleging school administrators at a Pearland junior high school colored in the student’s scalp with a permanent marker for violating dress code with his hair

On the eve of one of the most important presidential elections of our lifetime, many Americans are justifiably focused on the Congressional hearings to impeach President Donald Trump. But while...

September 9, 2019

On Sept. 1, Kim Anglin Anderson will become the first woman and first person of color to serve as executive director of the National Education Association (NEA), the largest union for teachers in the United States.
A native of Fairfax County, Va., Anderson received her bachelor’s degree from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., and a law degree from The George Washington University. Before her historic appoint...

Brittany Harris (pictured), is improving literacy rates and math scores of children in the Chattanooga, Tenn., area by bringing the lessons to their doorsteps via her mobile classroom called The Passage.

As a third-grade teacher, Harris noticed students weren’t reaching benchmark achievement levels, so she brainstormed how to teach them in a new way.

Her answer came in the form of a small bus, purchased with her own money, which...

During the 40th annual Martin Luther King oratorical festival at our Oakland neighborhood public school earlier this year, the mosaic of children's faces revealed the full spectrum of our country’s most diverse state. On this day, we adults experienced the world anew through the bright eyes of children. White and Black children alike advocated for justice and equality for their brown neighbors. Boys raised their fists for fema...

In 1954, the United States Supreme Court ruled in the Brown v. Board of Education decision that separate but equal schools were unconstitutional. The ruling changed the course of history and the lives of students — Black and White — nationwide.

Before the Brown decision, Black high school students in Clinton, Tenn., traveled more than 20 miles each way to Knoxville, to attend an all-Black high school because the only high schoo...

In We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom, University of Georgia education professor Bettina Love offers a striking and searing take on U.S. education. Drawing on close to 20 years of experience working in, and researching, urban schools, Love argues that Black, Latinx and Native American children—full of promise and possibilities—are regularly and methodically deprived of...

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The Crisis magazine is a quarterly journal of politics, culture, civil rights and history that seeks to educate and challenge its readers about issues facing African-Americans and other communities of color.

© The Crisis Magazine 

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