August 29, 2020

Bayard Rustin was the brains behind the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. 

When the late civil rights pioneer Bayard Rustin was pardoned by the California governor this past February for a 1953 conviction levied against him for being gay, his surviving partner, Walter Naegle, said he believed it caused Rustin pain to have to subsume his gay identity to remain central to the push for Black equality. 

That’s how Rusti...

July 19, 2020

The NAACP is devastated by the passing of Congressman John Lewis, a giant in the Civil Rights Movement who carried the mantle in the continuing battle for civil rights and equal justice in our nation.

We are deeply saddened by his passing but profoundly grateful for the contributions he made in his lifetime. His life-long career of pushing this nation toward justice, fairness and liberty left a permanent impression on our nati...

July 4, 2020

John Lewis: Good Trouble isn’t filmmaker Dawn Porter’s first documentary but just may be the first set to debut with such perfect timing.

The tragic, preventable deaths of George Floyd, Rayshard Brooks, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery inform African Americans and citizens of the world that racial prejudices still devastate.

Good Trouble, set to debut in theaters and on demand on July 3, is an in-depth look at the life and times...

June 23, 2020

Jennifer Pinckney is just beginning to grieve.

It's been five years since white supremacist, Dylann Roof brutally murdered nine Black people at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, on the evening of June 17, 2015, during Bible study. Pinckney’s husband, the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the church’s pastor, and a South Carolina State senator were one of the nine killed. 

The coronavirus shelter-in-place order has given P...

As far as pop culture and literature go, we have everything from I Am Legend and World War Z to Handmaids Tale, and many things in between to tell us about how this coronavirus unzips.  As a culture, we’ve told ourselves so many dystopian stories, we can’t discern between those and the reality that everyone is now living.  However, for many — depending on your race, class and so many other areas of identity — these stories of...

April 26, 2020

As a college student, Dekoven Riggins came across an interesting exhibit several years ago at Langston University.

“I was just walking through the library and there was this huge display,” the Oklahoma City native told attendees at a screening of his feature film, Black Wall Street Burning at Tulsa’s Circle Cinema in February. “I walked past the display and then I moonwalked backwards and said, ‘What is this?’”

The display was a...

April 17, 2020

Mr. Nate could step forward or step back. He was among the most persistent and effective grassroots organizers in Mississippi. Day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year, he built relationships and built on relationships, encouraging people to register to vote, to participate in agricultural elections, to run for office, to send their children to Headstart, to desegregate the schools, to buy shares in a...

February 18, 2020

Diahann Carroll was a class act.   
Period.

Carroll died of breast cancer on Oct. 4, 2019, at the age of 84. She was a barrier-breaker, pioneer and trailblazer.

In 1962, she became the first Black female to win a Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical for the Richard Rodgers Broadway musical, No Strings. She was the first African American, male or female, to be nominated for an Emmy Award for her role in the groundbreakin...

February 9, 2020

On Feb. 12, 1900, Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing was performed by school children in Jacksonville, Fla. The song’s author was James Weldon Johnson, a renaissance man who was an educator, lawyer, novelist and activist. Johnson initially imagined Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing as a poem that would celebrate the birthday of Abraham Lincoln. But on the page it became something else.

Johnson’s lyrics told the story of Black life in terms that...

February 8, 2020

 Cynthia Erivo earned two Academy Award nominations for her starring role as the prolific hero Harriet Tubman in the film Harriet, setting her on the path to becoming an EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony) winner. Erivo was nominated for Best Actress and Best Original Song.
At 32, the South London-born actress has already earned herself a Tony, an Emmy and a Grammy for her work in the Broadway version of The Color Purple.

Her impr...

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The Crisis magazine is a quarterly journal of politics, culture, civil rights and history that seeks to educate and challenge its readers about issues facing African-Americans and other communities of color.

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