December 9, 2019

 In 1965, playwright and poet Amiri Baraka (b. Leroi Jones) challenged the theatrical status quo by creating the Black Arts Repertory Theatre/School (BARTS) in Harlem. The opening of the theater is considered to be the beginning of the Black Arts Movement, which has been dubbed the “second renaissance,” a nod to the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Founded shortly after the assassination of Malcolm X, BARTS’ opening ushered in...

December 9, 2019

I loved Toni Morrison long before I read a word she’d written.

Her life was an epic poem, a love poem written to African Americans — and by extension to all of humanity.

She wrote from the intimacy of deep-in-the-bone knowledge. It was knowledge that she learned first at the feet of her parents and other family members. She listened, and she watched, and she carried their words with her. She saw too the ghosts who would follow h...

In 1954, the United States Supreme Court ruled in the Brown v. Board of Education decision that separate but equal schools were unconstitutional. The ruling changed the course of history and the lives of students — Black and White — nationwide.

Before the Brown decision, Black high school students in Clinton, Tenn., traveled more than 20 miles each way to Knoxville, to attend an all-Black high school because the only high schoo...

In We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom, University of Georgia education professor Bettina Love offers a striking and searing take on U.S. education. Drawing on close to 20 years of experience working in, and researching, urban schools, Love argues that Black, Latinx and Native American children—full of promise and possibilities—are regularly and methodically deprived of...

April 9, 2019

For four years, freelance writer and author Osha Gray Davidson delved deep into the complicated and unlikely history of Ann Atwater, a Black grassroots activist who worked with a Klu Klux Klan leader in the 70s to help desegregate local schools in Durham, N.C. Davidson’s book, The Best of Enemies, is now a feature film starring award-winning actress Taraji P. Henson. Davidson talked to The Crisis about why he felt the
need to...

The Hate U Give was one of 2018’s most discussed films. That’s because it struck a nerve for Black America — and for White America, too. The story deals with police brutality, how children deal with trauma and the choices people make at the intersection of fear, flight and what’s right. The movie was indeed a reflection of the mood in a country where unarmed African-American boys have been killed by police without consequence.

...

March 7, 2019

Susan Burton spent years in and out of California state prisons. She battled drug addiction and struggled with trauma stemming from childhood sexual abuse and the loss of her son who was tragically killed at age 5. She finally got help at a rehabilitation center in Santa Monica, Calif. It changed her life. Burton, 66, returned to her community and created A New Way of Life Reenty Project, a program for formerly incarcerated wo...

November 6, 2018

When Charlene Carruthers set out to write her new book, Unapologetic: A Black, Queer, and Feminist Mandate for Radical Movements, she realized that her role models — Ella Baker and Fannie Lou Hamer — didn’t necessarily have the opportunity or the space to write about the science of organizing and how they got things done. So Carruthers, the National Director of the Black Youth Project 100, an organization of Black activists be...

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The Crisis magazine is a quarterly journal of politics, culture, civil rights and history that seeks to educate and challenge its readers about issues facing African-Americans and other communities of color.

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